Mount Shasta: The Ups and Downs of Climbing a Glaciated Volcano (photos only)

MOUNT SHASTA

Mount Shasta, far and away Northern California’s dominant peak, rising two vertical miles above its surrounding landscape, is by any metric a serious mountain, 14,000 feet of rock and ice (oh, and on the inside: lava).

People really die up there (though in fairness, it hasn’t been lava’s fault for at least a quarter of a millenium- probably longer).

So yeah, people die up there.

Not me, though.  I just fly.

Up

About to climb Mt. Shasta, 2002. (photo by some random dude)
About to ascend Mt. Shasta, 2002.
(photo by some random dude)
About to climb Mt. Shasta, 2010. (photo by some random dude who thought we were some kind of semi-famous elite mountain climbers or whatever)
About to ascend Mt. Shasta, 2010.
(photo by some random dude who thought we were some kind of semi-famous elite mountain climbers or whatever)
About to climb Mt. Shasta. (photo by D. Moore)
About to ascend Mt. Shasta, 2010.
(photo by D. Moore)

 

Down

About to descend Mt. Shasta. (photo by P. Reich)
About to descend Mt. Shasta, 2002.
(photo by P. Reich)
About to descend Mt. Shasta (not from the summit), 2010. (photo by D. Speredelozzi)
About to descend Mt. Shasta, 2010.
(photo by D. Speredelozzi)
About to descend Mt. Shasta (by helicopter), 2010. (photo by D. Moore)
About to go for a ride in a helicopter (not by design), 2010.
(photo by D. Moore)

 

(coming soon: the story behind the photos)

 

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